GA4 Dimensions Tutorial with Free GA4 ebook

Table of Contents for GA4 Dimensions Tutorial

  1. Types of dimensions in GA4
  2. Primary dimensions in GA4
  3. How to change the primary dimension in GA4
  4. Secondary dimensions in GA4
  5. How to apply more than two dimensions to a GA4 report
  6. Introduction to default dimensions in GA4
  7. User acquisition dimensions
  8. Session acquisition dimensions
  9. User engagement dimensions
  10. Monetization dimensions
  11. User demographics dimensions
  12. Tech dimensions
  13. Custom dimensions in GA4

A dimension is one of the attributes of your website users.

For example, let us suppose 2147 people visited your website yesterday via Google organic search. Now all these 2147 people who visited your website have one common attribute; they all visited your website via Google organic search (which is reported as google/organic in GA4).

As a result ‘google / organic’ is one of the attributes of your 2147 website users.

Google Analytics reports the attribute of your website users as a dimension:

Each dimension is made up of names and values.

For example, ‘Sessions source/medium’ is the dimension name and ‘google/organic‘ is one of the values of this dimension.

The other values of the ‘Sessions source/medium’ dimension are 

  • (direct)/(none)
  • (not set) / (not set)
  • shop.googlemerchandisetore.com/referral

So, a single dimension (like ‘Sessions source/medium’) can have multiple values.

Another example, lt’s say a woman aged between 35-44 from New York visited your website after clicking on a paid search listing on Google. Let us also assume that she visited your website via a Safari web browser which is installed on a mobile device that runs IOS.

Now following are the attributes of the website user along with their values:

  • Gender – female
  • Age – 35-44
  • City – New York
  • Source / Medium – google / cpc
  • Browser – safari
  • Device Category – mobile
  • Operating System – IOS

Here, ‘Gender’, ‘Age’, ‘City’, ‘Source /Medium’, ‘Browser’, ‘Device Category’ and ‘Operating System’ are all reported as dimensions in GA4 because they are the characteristics of your website user.

Types of dimensions in GA4

The dimensions in GA4 can be broadly classified into two categories:

  1. Default dimensions
  2. Custom dimensions

Note: Both default and custom dimensions can be used as either a primary dimension or a secondary dimension.

The default dimensions can be further categorized into the following sub-categories:

  1. User acquisition dimensions
  2. Session acquisition dimensions
  3. User engagement dimensions
  4. Monetization dimensions
  5. User demographics dimensions
  6. Tech dimensions
  7. Other dimensions

The custom dimensions can be further categorized into the following sub-categories:

  1. Event-scoped custom dimensions
  2. User-scoped custom dimensions
 
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Primary dimensions in GA4

A primary dimension is the default dimension applied to a GA4 report.

When you navigate to a report say Traffic Acquisition report in your GA4 reporting view then the default dimension that you see being applied to the report is the primary dimension:

Here the primary dimension is ‘Session source/medium’.

How to change the primary dimension in GA4

You can change the primary dimension applied to a report.

Within a GA4 report, just click on the dimensions drop-down menu and then select the dimension you want to use:




Secondary dimensions in GA4

The second dimension that you apply to a GA4 report is called the secondary dimension.

In order to apply a secondary dimension to a report click on the ‘+’ button next to the primary dimension:





You can use a primary dimension as a secondary dimension and vice versa via the Analysis Hub reports:

How to apply more than two dimensions to a GA4 report

By default, you can apply a maximum of two dimensions to a GA4 report: one primary dimension and one secondary dimension.

But if you want to apply more than two dimensions then you can do that via the Analysis Hub reports. For example, through the Exploration report you can apply up to five dimensions at a time to a report: 

The additional dimensions can help you in doing a more meaningful analysis.

Introduction to default dimensions in GA4

The default dimensions are the dimensions that are already available in GA4 reports. They are ready to use dimensions.

The following are examples of the default dimensions:

  • ‘Age’
  • ‘City’
  • ‘Country’
  • ‘Gender’
  • ‘app version’
  • ‘browser’
  • ‘device category’
  • ‘hostname’
  • ‘user source’,
  • ‘user medium’,
  • ‘user campaign’,
  • ‘user source/medium’
  • ‘session medium’
  • ‘session source’
  • ‘session campaign’
  • ‘session source / medium’, etc

Following are the various subcategories of default dimensions: 

  • User acquisition dimensions
  • Session acquisition dimensions
  • User engagement dimensions
  • Monetization dimensions
  • User demographics dimensions
  • Tech dimensions
  • Other dimensions

User acquisition dimensions

The user acquisition dimensions give insight related to how your website/app acquired users.

Following are the examples of various user acquisition dimensions:

  1. User medium – The marketing channel by which the user was first acquired.
  2. User source – The website by which the user was first acquired. 
  3. User source/medium – The website and marketing channel by which the user was first acquired.
  4. User campaign – The marketing campaign by which the user was first acquired. 

Check out this help documentation to see the complete list of user acquisition dimensions: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/9143382?#zippy=%2Cacquisition 

Where can you find user acquisition dimensions in GA4?

You can see the user acquisition dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Acquisition Overview report
  2. User Acquisition report

Session acquisition dimensions

The session acquisition dimensions give insight related to how your website/app acquired users’ sessions (aka visits)

Following are the examples of various session acquisition dimensions:

  1. Session source/medium – the website and marketing channel that referred the user’s session.
  2. Session medium – the marketing channel that referred the user’s session.
  3. Session source – the website that referred the user’s session.
  4. Session campaign – the marketing campaign that referred the user’s session.
  5. Session default channel grouping – the default channel grouping that referred the user’s session. The Default Channel grouping is a rule-based grouping of default marketing channels.

Check out this help documentation to see the complete list of session acquisition dimensions: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/9143382?#zippy=%2Cacquisition 

Where can you find session acquisition dimensions in GA4?

You can see session acquisition dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Acquisition Overview report
  2. Traffic Acquisition report

User engagement dimensions

The user engagement dimensions give insight related to how users engaged with your website/app.

Following are the examples of various user engagement dimensions:

  1. Event name – The name of an event. This name can be default (i.e. predefined) or user-defined.
  1. Page title and screen class – web page title and default app screen class.
  2. Page path and screen class – web page path and default app screen class.
  3. Page title and screen name – web page title and default app screen name.
  4. Content group – It is a user-defined set of content.

Where can you find user engagement dimensions in GA4?

You can see user engagement dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Engagement Overview report
  2. Engagement Events report
  3. Pages and Screens report

Monetization dimensions

The monetization dimensions give insight related to how your website/app monetize users.

Following are examples of various monetization dimensions:

  1. Item list name – the name of the item list.
  2. Item promotion name – the name of the promotion for the sold item.
  3. Order coupon – code for the order-level coupon.
  1. Item name – the name of the item sold.
  2. Item ID – ID of the item sold
  3. Item category – Hierarchical category in which the sold item is classified. For example, in Shoes/Mens/Nike, ‘shoes’ is the item category.
  4. Item category 2 – Hierarchical category in which the sold item is classified. For example, in Shoes/Mens/Nike, ‘Mens’ is the item category 2.
  5. Item category 3 – Hierarchical category in which the sold item is classified. For example, in Shoes/Mens/Nike, ‘Nike’ is the item category 3.
  6. Item brand – brand name of the sold item.
  1. Product ID – Product code of items sold.
  1. Ad Unit – space on your website or app that displayed the ad.

Check out this help documentation to see the complete list of monetization dimensions: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/9143382#zippy=%2Cmonetization 

Where can you find monetization dimensions in GA4?

You can see monetization dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Monetization Overview report
  2. Ecommerce Purchases report
  3. In-app Purchases report
  4. Publisher Ads report

User demographics dimensions

The user demographics dimensions give insight related to the demographics (age, gender, interest, country, etc) of your website/app users.

Following are the examples of various user demographics dimensions:

  1. Country – the name of the country from which the user’s activity originated.
  2. Region – the name of the region from which the user’s activity originated.
  3. City – the name of the city from which the user’s activity originated.
  4. Language – the language setting for the device used by the user.
  5. Age – the age group your website/app users belong to.
  6. Gender – the gender (male or female) of your users. 
  7. Interests – the interest(s) demonstrated by your users.

Where can you find user demographic dimensions in GA4?

You can see user demographics dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Demographics Overview report
  2. Demographic Details report

Tech dimensions

The tech dimensions give insight related to the technology (device, browser, operating system, screen resolution, etc) used by your website/app users.

Following are the examples of various tech dimensions:

  1. Browser – the name of the web browser used by your users to engage with your website.
  2. Device Category – the type of device (Desktop, Tablet, or Mobile) used to engage with your website/app.
  3. Device Model – the model of the device (Chrome, Safari, iPhone etc) used to engage with your website/app.
  4. Screen Resolution – the resolution of the screen used to engage with your website/app.

Check out this help documentation to see the complete list of the tech dimensions: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/9143382#zippy=%2Ctech 

Where can you find the tech dimensions in GA4?

You can see the tech dimensions in the following GA4 reports:

  1. Tech Overview report
  2. Tech Details report

Custom dimensions in GA4

Custom dimensions are user-defined dimensions that should be used to measure the characteristics of users that can not be measured by any default dimension.

For example, there is no default dimension available in GA4 through which you measure the behaviour of signed-in and not signed-in users. Similarly, there is no default dimension available in GA4 through which you measure the behaviour of high-value and low-value customers. 

In such cases, you should consider creating custom dimensions in GA4. 

The custom dimensions in GA4 can be categorized into:

  1. Event-scoped custom dimensions
  2. User-scoped custom dimensions

To learn more about custom dimensions in GA4, check out this article: GA4 Custom Dimensions Tutorial

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